Ruby

Bought your book this morning and have been enjoying it.  I have a question, and then a comment. I am 64.  I have always been adventurous.  I find myself at a crossroad in my life, trying to figure my next move.  I had been considering vanaboding, at least for a few years, but there is one issue I don't know how to resolve.  I have severe sleep apnea and sleep with an electric powered c-pap machine.  I can't see how to manage this while parked at Walmart.  Do you have any thoughts?

0 0
journeyman
The idea of Vanaboding is to reduce your overhead to the point that you can travel job free (gain back as much time as you can). However you do NOT have to do it EXACTLY as I have described. I think you would need to use a CLASS B conversion van with a generator for your medical equipment and SKIP all the cost saving stealth stuff all together. You can you can still do it on a small budget, and STILL stay out for a week or two at a time, then refill your fuel for the van and generator and move to a new spot. The only thing you give up is staying in CITIES where running the generator all night would bring unwelcome attention. 
0 0
Ruby
Well, one of the most attractive things about this option is staying in cities.  I lived in San Francisco for 32 years and in Las Vegas for 5.  As you mentioned in your book, both are great cities. I saw you had some sort of conversion gadget that fit in an outlet in your truck.  Is this not something I could use to power my c-pap?  If I had to go to a motor home, I would probably go with truck and travel trailer, since I can't stealth camp anyway.  But that really costs a lot more.  Sure would like to be stealthy! 
0 0
journeyman

Try the inverter described in the Vanabode book, it may offer enough power for your medical device but I am not sure.

0 0
AbeFroman
This can be done with the right setup. You will need to have an auxiliary battery, a battery isolator and the wiring installed on your van along with purchasing a pure sine wave inverter.

The cpap probably draws around 100 watts of power give or take so a 300+ watt inverter will suit you just fine. There are two types of inverters. A modified sine wave and a pure sine wave. The pure sine wave produces clean power just like what is in your house. Some electronics and equipment may not run on the modified sine wave units or have their life shortened. As I am sure that the machine is expensive and you will be best off to spend the extra money on a quality inverter.

Running a 100watt load all night will kill your battery overnight making it necessary to install another battery and an isolator that will allow the battery to be charged while the engine is running but will not draw down the main battery. On a chevy you should be able to buy the 2nd battery tray from gm that is used on the vans with the diesel engine and just bolt it into the engine bay for a factory looking installation (double check by looking at a diesel van at the dealer). Then just hook up the isolator and run the wires from the aux battery to the cargo area where you need power.

0 0
nancr7399
You might want to check out 12 volt c-pap in an online search. there are c-pap batteries and cord adapters and other products. Am checking it out myself right now for my husband.
0 0
vanabode
I have a ResMed CPAP machine with humidifier and heater, and there is a 12 volt power unit available for it. The humidifier and heater are real benefits. Also, it's much more efficient than converting from DC to AC, and then having the CPAP machine convert that to the DC voltage it requires. Much better battery life.

I did install a second battery, which I can disconnect from the main system so that I don't run my primary battery down.
Bob the Bat
1 0


Home     Contact Us     Privacy Policy      Terms and Conditions